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Despite the myriad obstacles in its path, the controversial Millennium Hollywood development continues to march toward reality.

Earlier today, the Los Angeles Times reported that the City's Department of Building and Safety approved new geological reports which found that no active earthquake fault beneath the site of the proposed high-rise complex.  This result contradicts the official stance of the California Geological Survey, which concluded last year that an active fault line ran directly through the properties at 1720-1770 and 1745-1753 North Vine Street.

Although both parties agree upon the approximate location of the fault line, the difference of opinion stems from its estimated age.  California state law defines an "active," fault as one which has ruptured within the past 11,000 years.  However, studies performed by Group Delta - a geotechnical firm hired by Millennium Partners - indicate that the Hollywood fault line is more than 150,000 years old.

While concerns over earthquake safety have proven to be their must potent ammunition thus far, opponents of the Millennium Hollywood have made numerous arguments in their effort to halt the development.  Several commenters responding to the project's draft environmental impact report argued that the proposed towers would block views and worsen traffic congestion.

The $654-million development would include approximately one million square feet of residences, offices, hotel rooms, stores and restaurants.  Approved plans would allow for the construction of 39- and 35-story buildings on parking lots which flank the Capitol Records Building.  The project would also include a smaller mid-rise structure at the intersection of Yucca Street and Ivar Avenue.

Although the Millennium Hollywood has served as a lightning rod for opposition to the spread of high-density development in Hollywood, it is merely one of several high-rise complexes planned for nearby properties.  Immediately east of the project site, a trio of high-rise towers are planned for the intersection of Yucca Street and Argyle Avenue.