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An initial study published by the Los Angeles Department of City Planning offers up a first glimpse of Van Nuys Plaza, Ketter Construction's proposal to develop a residential-retail complex at the intersection of Van Nuys Boulevard and Kittridge Street in the San Fernando Valley.

The proposed development, slated for a 1.2-acre site at the southwest corner of the intersection, would replace three commercial buildings and a surface parking lot.  Plans call for a six-story edifice, featuring 174 studio, one-, and two-bedroom apartments - including 10 units set aside for very-low-income households - above approximately 18,400 square feet of ground-floor retail space and 400 parking stalls.

In-house architects for Ketter are designing the project, which a rendering portrays as a contemporary mid-rise building.  The podium-type structure would incorporate open-space amenities including a courtyard with a swimming pool, a fitness center, and various outdoor decks.

Construction of the Van Nuys Plaza is expected to occur over approximately 15 months, beginning in Fall 2018.

The project site sits along a busy commercial stretch of Van Nuys Boulevard located north of the Van Nuys Civic Center and a station on the Orange Line busway.  While this corridor is home to numerous storefronts, it is mostly devoid of multifamily residential construction.

 

Rendering of Van Nuys Plaza. Image via LADCP.
Van Nuys Plaza site. Image via Google Maps.

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