Advertisement

Last Friday, Urbana Development broke ground on the Terminal at Douglas Park, a series of office condominiums in Long Beach.

Phase one of the project, located at Conant Street and Brayer Avenue, will consists of two buildings featuring 50,000 square feet of office space in 20 condominium units ranging from 2,356 square feet to 2,888 square feet in size.  The units could be combined in different configurations to create larger spaces.

Heavy construction is expected to begin in Noember, with completion to follow in the third quarter of 2017.  According to Urbana, 14 of the 20 units are already under contract.

The two-story, concrete tilt-up buildings are portrayed with modern and contemporary designs, featuring balconies, private patios and operable windows.  They will be built to current CALGreen building codes, with rooftop solar panels, indigenous landscaping and electric car charging stations.

A second phase of the project, scheduled to break ground in 2017, will create four additional buildings with 100,000 square feet of office space in 40 units.

Rendering of the Terminal at Douglas Park (Image: Urbana Development)
Rendering of the Terminal at Douglas Park (Image: Urbana Development)
Rendering of the Terminal at Douglas Park (Image: Urbana Development)
Rendering of the Terminal at Douglas Park (Image: Urbana Development)
Rendering of the Terminal at Douglas Park (Image: Urbana Development)
Rendering of the Terminal at Douglas Park (Image: Urbana Development)
Rendering of the Terminal at Douglas Park (Image: Urbana Development)
Rendering of the Terminal at Douglas Park (Image: Urbana Development)
Rendering of the Terminal at Douglas Park (Image: Urbana Development)
Rendering of the Terminal at Douglas Park (Image: Urbana Development)
Rendering of the Terminal at Douglas Park (Image: Urbana Development)

From the Web

City Looks to Update Land Use and Transportation Along Rail-to-River Corridor

A freight railway that cuts through South L.A. is set for rebirth as an active transportion corridor.
bar

In 2012, Metro began exploring the possibility of transforming a segment of a former freight rail right-of-way that cuts through the heart of South Los Angeles into an active transportation project.  The project, now known as the Rail-to-River corridor, would convert the Harbor Subdivision - which runs east-to-west along Florence and Slauson Avenues - for use by pedestrians and cyclists.

To capitalize on this investment, the Cit