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The Glendale City Council has voted last week to approve the design of the proposed Armenian American Museum and has directed city staff to negotiate terms of a 95-year ground lease for a project site in Glendale Central Park.

The proposed arrangement, which is expected to be finalized this Summer, would have an initial term of 55 years with options for up to four 10-year extensions.  The museum would pay $1 per year to the City of Glendale.

Alajajian Marcoosi Architects is designing the approximately 30,000-square-foot building, which would replace a grass field along Colorado Street to the east of Brand Boulevard.  The museum is incorporated into a new master plan for Glendale Central Park, which calls for adding new green space to replace what would be lost through the museum.

The building, which is being designed to evoke the Verdugo Mountains north of Glendale, will incorporate exhibition space and research opportunities focused on Armenian American history.

 

Rendering of the Armenian American Museum. Image via Armenian American Museum.
Rendering of the Armenian American Museum. Image via Armenian American Museum.
Rendering of the Armenian American Museum. Image via Armenian American Museum.
Rendering of the Armenian American Museum. Image via Armenian American Museum.
Rendering of the Armenian American Museum. Image via Armenian American Museum.
Rendering of the Armenian American Museum. Image via Armenian American Museum.
Rendering of the Armenian American Museum. Image via Armenian American Museum.
Rendering of the Armenian American Museum. Image via Armenian American Museum.
Rendering of the Armenian American Museum. Image via Armenian American Museum.
Rendering of the Armenian American Museum. Image via Armenian American Museum.
Rendering of the Armenian American Museum. Image via Armenian American Museum.
Rendering of the Armenian American Museum. Image via Armenian American Museum.
Rendering of the Armenian American Museum. Image via Armenian American Museum.
Rendering of the Armenian American Museum. Image via Armenian American Museum.
Rendering of the Armenian American Museum. Image via Armenian American Museum.
Rendering of the Armenian American Museum. Image via Armenian American Museum.
Rendering of the Armenian American Museum. Image via Armenian American Museum.
Rendering of the Armenian American Museum. Image via Armenian American Museum.
Rendering of the Armenian American Museum. Image via Armenian American Museum.
Rendering of the Armenian American Museum. Image via Armenian American Museum.
Rendering of the Armenian American Museum. Image via Armenian American Museum.
Rendering of the Armenian American Museum. Image via Armenian American Museum.
Rendering of the Armenian American Museum. Image via Armenian American Museum.
Rendering of the Armenian American Museum. Image via Armenian American Museum.
Rendering of the Armenian American Museum. Image via Armenian American Museum.
Rendering of the Armenian American Museum. Image via Armenian American Museum.
Rendering of the Armenian American Museum. Image via Armenian American Museum.
Rendering of the Armenian American Museum. Image via Armenian American Museum.

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Four-Story Development Tops Out at 1st & Fairfax

The project includes 45 apartments and ground-floor retail space.
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The wood-and-concrete frame of a small mixed-use development near The Grove is now complete. The four-story development, which comes from local real estate firm Conroy Commercial, replaces an auto body repair shop at 1st Street and Fairfax Avenue.  City records indicate the building will feature 45 residential units atop 1,258 square feet of ground-floor commercial space above a basement parking garage. Ovalle Architects, a Long Beach-based firm, designed the contemporary low-rise structure.