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Next week, the L.A. City Council's Transportation Committee will consider an LADOT staff recommendation to reallocate $6.2 million in Measure R funds toward six previously unfunded projects in Boyle Heights, Downtown, and South Los Angeles.

One of the most prominent projects, called "Cesar Chavez Connections," would receive $1.85 million, adding to $900,000 is mandated city funds.  Plans call for the installation of streetscape and transportation enhancements along Cesar Chavez Avenue between Alameda Street and Grand Avenue in El Pueblo, including pedestrian and transit plazas at Spring Street, Broadway, and Grand Avenue.

Another project, associated with the Sixth Street Viaduct Replacement, would provide $2.5 million for sidewalk and bike path improvements along Mission Street and Myers Street between the new viaduct and the existing 7th Street crossing.

The other previously unfunded projects are:

  • Safe routes to schools infrastructure improvements for Sheridan Street Elementary and Breed Street Elementary
  • Safe routes to school infrastructure for Dolores Huerta Elementary, 28th Street Elementary, and Quincy Jones Elementary.
  • Safe routes to school infrastructure for Menlo Avenue Elementary and West Vernon Elementary.
  • Safe routes to school improvements for Van Nuys Elementary

The plan, if approved by the L.A. City Council, could also be used to fund the increased scope of the Arts District/Little Tokyo Gold Line Station linkages project.

The Measure R funds were previously earmarked for projects by the Community Redevelopment Agency, which has since been dissolved.

Cesar Chavez Avenue between Alameda and Grand. Image via Google Maps.

Data Center Planned for Parking Lot Near Union Station Terminal Annex

Transit-oriented data center?
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A large parking lot next door to the Union Station Terminal Annex Building is slated for development as a data center. CoreSite Realty Corp., a Denver-based owner and operator of data centers across the country, is behind the proposed development, which would raze the parking lot at 900 N. Alameda Street for the construction of a four-story, 93-foot-tall data center with nearly 180,000 square feet of floor area.