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An eyecatching development slated for a prominent site in Downtown Culver City may finally be taking steps forward.

The Real Deal L.A. reports that on Tuesday, Hackman Capital Partners has purchased the development rights for a parking lot at 9300 Culver Boulevard from fellow real estate investment trust Hudson Pacific Properties.  The property, also known as Parcel B, is the site of a Culver Steps, a mixed-use complex that HPP had been pursuing with developer Combined Properties.

Although future plans for Parcel B are unclear, a project page from the Combined Properties website describes it as featuring 65,000 square feet of offices above 45,000 square feet of ground-floor retail space and a subterranenan parking garage.

The design, by Culver City-based EYRC Architects, calls for a four-story structure highlighted by a is highlighted by a grand staircase leading to a 10,000-square-foot elevated plaza.  The proposed building is oriented towards the historic Culver Hotel and other nearby shops and businesses in the downtown area.

A city website lists a 2017 start date for construction.

Rendering of Culver City Steps (Image: Combined Properties)
Rendering of Culver City Steps (Image: Combined Properties)
Rendering of Culver City Steps (Image: Combined Properties)
Rendering of Culver City Steps (Image: Combined Properties)
Rendering of Culver City Steps (Image: Combined Properties)
Rendering of Culver City Steps (Image: Combined Properties)
Rendering of Culver City Steps (Image: Combined Properties)
Project site and surroundings (Google Maps)

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City Looks to Update Land Use and Transportation Along Rail-to-River Corridor

A freight railway that cuts through South L.A. is set for rebirth as an active transportion corridor.
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In 2012, Metro began exploring the possibility of transforming a segment of a former freight rail right-of-way that cuts through the heart of South Los Angeles into an active transportation project.  The project, now known as the Rail-to-River corridor, would convert the Harbor Subdivision - which runs east-to-west along Florence and Slauson Avenues - for use by pedestrians and cyclists.

To capitalize on this investment, the Cit