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Following a full year of delays, the highly-anticipated renovation of Los Angeles State Historic Park has finally kicked back into gear.

The 34-acre expanse on the northern edge of Chinatown - alternatively known as the Cornfield - shut down for its $20-million overhaul in April 2014, and was originally scheduled to re-open one year later.  However, the Downtown News reports that construction crews discovered contaminants buried underneath the park during utility installation, including an uncharted building foundation and layers of ash from the railyard which once occupied the site.  This resulted in the completion date being pushed back to November 2015.

That date has since come and gone, with little evidence of progress until recent months, when crews recommenced with grading and landscaping the park.  However, a precise timeline for completion still remains unclear.

Ongoing work can be seen in the photographs posted below.

Image via Spurlock Poirier
Image via Spurlock Poirier
Image via Spurlock Poirier
Image via Spurlock Poirier
Image via Spurlock Poirier
Image via Spurlock Poirier

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City Looks to Update Land Use and Transportation Along Rail-to-River Corridor

A freight railway that cuts through South L.A. is set for rebirth as an active transportion corridor.
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In 2012, Metro began exploring the possibility of transforming a segment of a former freight rail right-of-way that cuts through the heart of South Los Angeles into an active transportation project.  The project, now known as the Rail-to-River corridor, would convert the Harbor Subdivision - which runs east-to-west along Florence and Slauson Avenues - for use by pedestrians and cyclists.

To capitalize on this investment, the Cit