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Since selling its longtime Culver City home in 2015, it has been expected that Surfas Culinary District would need to search for a new location.  Situated for 35 years at 8777 Washington Boulevard, Surfas is now without an address, its former building slated for redevelopment as the new Los Angeles headquarters for HBO.  However, it now looks like the beloved kitchen supply store will be sticking around, albeit in a different form.

Surfas has announced a new food concept known as "Best of Surfas," that will be incorporated into the four-story, 128,000-square-foot office building, which is being developed as a joint venture between Clarion Partners and Lincoln Property Company.  Additional details about the new restaurant have not been provided, although it would likely occupy at least a portion of 4,500 square feet of commercial space planned at the building's ground level.

Surfas ownership remains on the hunt for a new location for the kitchen supply store, per the announcement, but has not finalized any deal as of July.  A second location in Orange County was also closed earlier this year, to allow Surfas to focus on its new ventures in Los Angeles.

Clarion and Lincoln paid approximately $25 million to take ownership the property last year, according to a report by the Real Deal LAAlthough an earlier vision for the site had called for a mixture of office space and apartments, the development firms tapped Gensler to redesign the project without residential units.

Demolition of the existing building is expected to occur this summer.

The project follows the recent start of work at the Ivy Station mixed-use complex across the street, which is replacing the Culver City Metro rail station's park-and-ride lot.

Image via Gensler
Image via Gensler
Image via Gensler
Image via 8777 Washington

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City Looks to Update Land Use and Transportation Along Rail-to-River Corridor

A freight railway that cuts through South L.A. is set for rebirth as an active transportion corridor.
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In 2012, Metro began exploring the possibility of transforming a segment of a former freight rail right-of-way that cuts through the heart of South Los Angeles into an active transportation project.  The project, now known as the Rail-to-River corridor, would convert the Harbor Subdivision - which runs east-to-west along Florence and Slauson Avenues - for use by pedestrians and cyclists.

To capitalize on this investment, the Cit