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In January, the resurrection of the Los Angeles Rams marked the end of the NFL's 20-year absence in Southern California.  The team has now settled into temporary accommodations at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, and will play its home games at a $2.66-billion stadium in Inglewood by the year 2018.

While the return of professional football was met with great fanfare by countless Angelenos, two organizations were left disappointed by the outcome.  The Oakland Raiders and the San Diego Chargers, which had also applied for relocation to Los Angeles, banded together in February 2015 to push an alternate plan for a $1.7-billion stadium in Carson.  Their proposal was ultimately rejected by a vote of the the NFL owners, who favored the more grandiose project envisioned by Rams owner Stan Kroenke.

This development meant that the Raiders-Chargers stadium, designed by Manica Architecture, would be relegated to the long list of Los Angeles' never-built football venues.  Or so we thought.

Yesterday, the Southern Nevada Tourism Infrastructure Committee (SNTIC) reviewed plans from a development team consisting of the Raiders, Las Vegas Sands Corp. and Majestic Realty Co. for a potential NFL stadium west of the Las Vegas Strip.  The proposed stadium, also designed by Manica Architecture, bears an unmistakable resemblance to the unbuilt Carson venue.

Compare for yourself using the images below.

Rendering of the proposed Las Vegas Raiders stadium (Image: Manica Architecture)
Rendering of the unbuilt Carson stadium (Image: Manica Architecture)
Rendering of the proposed Las Vegas Raiders stadium (Image: Manica Architecture)
Rendering of the unbuilt Carson stadium (Image: Manica Architecture)
Rendering of the proposed Las Vegas Raiders stadium (Image: Manica Architecture)
Rendering of the unbuilt Carson stadium (Image: Manica Architecture)

From the Web

Checking in on the Slow-Moving 1133 Hope Condo Tower

The 28-story tower broke ground in March 2017.
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Slowly but surely, the concrete frame of 1133 Hope Street rises in South Park. The 28-story tower, located just east of Metro's Pico Station, will feature 200 residential units above 5,000 square feet of ground-floor retail uses and a parking podium upon completion.  Plans for the mixed-use project dated back to 2005, when the Canadian development firm Amacon initially submitted plans for a 35-story building on the site.