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Last month, Rising Realty Partners granted us a tour of The Trust Building, a historic building now in the midst of a full restoration in Downtown Los Angeles.

Completed in 1928 at 433 S. Spring Street, the 11-story structure will offer 338,000 square feet of rentable space atop ground-floor retail upon completion later this year.  Originally known as the Title Insurance and Trust Building, it is being redesigned by a team that includes Gensler and Architectural Resources Group to make the vintage property appeal to modern tenants.

Designed by Parkinson & Parkinson, the Art Deco building was named for its signature tenant - the Title Insurance and Trust Company, one of the earliest and most prominent Southern California title insurance companies.  Title Insurance called the building home from its opening in 1928 until decamping for the Miracle Mile in 1977.  It also served as a temporary home for the Los Angeles Central Library, while its main facility was under restoration and expansion following a disastrous fire in the 1980s.

The restoration includes the Trust Building's exterior facade, main lobby, and banking hall, which will be returned to their 1930s and 1940s appearances.  Plans also call for a full seismic retrofit of the property, and upgrades to non-historic features, with a target of LEED Platinum certification.

The Trust Building is scheduled to open for tenants later this year.

View the building's unique features below, with photography by Hunter Kerhart and descriptions by Architectural Resources Group.

Rising Realty has also undertaken restorations of other historic office towers in Downtown, including the PacMutual Building and the CalEdison.

The Trust Building as seen from Spring Street Park. Image courtesy of Hunter Kerhart Architectural Photography
Mosaics designed by Hugo Ballin above The Trust Building's main entrance. Image courtesy of Hunter Kerhart Architectural Photography
Polychromatic tile ceiling in The Trust Building’s entrance vestibule. The tile was designed by Parkinson & Parkinson and Herman Sachs. Image courtesy of Hunter Kerhart Architectural Photography
Polychromatic tile ceiling in The Trust Building’s entrance vestibule. The tile was designed by Parkinson & Parkinson and Herman Sachs. Image courtesy of Hunter Kerhart Architectural Photography
Cerrated terra cotta opening at the entrance vestibule. Image courtesy of Hunter Kerhart Architectural Photography
Door surround with Art Deco details. Image courtesy of Hunter Kerhart Architectural Photography
Painted finish conservation in the main lobby. Image courtesy of Hunter Kerhart Architectural Photography
The Title Insurance & Trust Company’s former banking hall at the building's second floor. A new mezzanine space is being inserted into the double-height room. Image courtesy of Hunter Kerhart Architectural Photography
The Title Insurance & Trust Company’s former banking hall. A new mezzanine space is being inserted into the double-height room. Image courtesy of Hunter Kerhart Architectural Photography
The Banking Hall's former vault. Image courtesy of Hunter Kerhart Architectural Photography
The Banking Hall's former vault. Image courtesy of Hunter Kerhart Architectural Photography
Pneumatic tube system for internal document distribution. Image courtesy of Hunter Kerhart Architectural Photography
View of the banking hall from the mezzanine structure. Image courtesy of Hunter Kerhart Architectural Photography
Decorative painted detail on the ceiling of the Banking Hall, recently cleaned. This is the only example of this design found so far. Image courtesy of Hunter Kerhart Architectural Photography
Looking down the mezzanine in the banking hall. Image courtesy of Hunter Kerhart Architectural Photography
Another view of the banking hall. Image courtesy of Hunter Kerhart Architectural Photography
10th floor of the Trust Building. Originally the executive offices for the Trust company with wood paneling and decorative painted ceilings. Image courtesy of Hunter Kerhart Architectural Photography
10th floor of the Trust Building. Originally the executive offices for the Trust company with wood paneling and decorative painted ceilings. Image courtesy of Hunter Kerhart Architectural Photography
10th floor of the Trust Building. Originally the executive offices for the Trust company with wood paneling and decorative painted ceilings. Image courtesy of Hunter Kerhart Architectural Photography
View of the Downtown skyline from the Trust Building's 10th floor. Image courtesy of Hunter Kerhart Architectural Photography
Typical office space with exposed brick and concrete structures. Image courtesy of Hunter Kerhart Architectural Photography
Elevator lobby. Image courtesy of Hunter Kerhart Architectural Photography
Former theater space on the 6th floor. Originally open space, the room was enclosed in the 1950s as the Title Insurance & Trust Company expanded. Remnant exterior walls are visible to the left and right, while skylights have been added to the ceiling above. Openings for film projectors can be seen at the center of the image. Image courtesy of Hunter Kerhart Architectural PhotographyImage courtesy of Hunter Kerhart Architectural Photography
Roof terrace showing historic fire escapes. The copper structure at the right is an air intake structure designed by Parkinson & Parkinson.Image courtesy of Hunter Kerhart Architectural Photography
View of Spring Street Park from the Trust Building's roof terrace. Image courtesy of Hunter Kerhart Architectural Photography